2010 Indian Chief Vintage

2010 Indian Chief Vintage
2010 Indian Chief Vintage

Motorcycle.com got their hands on a 2010 Indian Chief Vintage for a ride review.  The pictures are nice, and, apparently, the bike is even better-looking in person.

Its acre’s worth of chrome was so flawless, we wondered whether Indian had found alchemists who’d replaced mere chromium with magically-applied liquid mercury instead. “This might be the best quality chrome on a production bike I’ve seen to date,” quipped Pete on the Chief’s high-luster shiny stuff.

Likewise, the leatherwork looked and felt like it had been produced by a high-end boutique. The seat is actually supplied by Milsco, the same Milwaukee-based saddle-maker that had outfitted early-1940s and later Indians for some time before the original company ceased production in 1953.

Alas, despite the beauty, there are also some blemishes.

Unfortunately, we can not compliment some of the other buzzes this bike’s engine induced. It visibly shook the tank, and audible resonation came possibly from the windshield – or maybe it was just the tank? In top gear at cruising speed with earplugs in, it was still audible. Specifically, the buzz began at around 2,600 rpm, and discouraged us from wanting to rev it anywhere near its 5,250 rpm redline.

After riding the Vintage on the highway, Pete said he felt like his feet might vibrate off the floorboards.

The 105ci V-Twin powerplant is rigidly mounted, and has no counter-balancers, which might account for the vibration problem.  Of course, it is a “vintage” model, so vintage design isn’t completely out of place.  and, besides, vibration is really in the butt of the beholder, right?

Well, maybe.  But when you’re riding a bike that costs as much as an Acura, you might want a little refinement in comfort to go along with all that liquid-mercury chrome.

2010 Indian Motorcycles

Indian Motorcycle is America’s oldest motorcycle brand–although not, it should be pointed out, the oldest continuous manufacturer, due to an unfortunate number of bankruptcies.  The venerable brand keeps being revived though, and in its current incarnation, the company has unveiled its 2010 lineup of Indian Chief motorcycles at Sturgis.  Top among them is Indian’s version of a dark custom motorcycle, the Dark Chief.

A special model for the 2010 year is the Indian Chief bomber, a motorcycle whose styling is based on World War II aircraft.  According to the company:

Inspired by WWII aircraft, the Bomber is a limited edition Chief model and will only be available for one year. The Bomber is available in Military Green and Silver Smoke finishes. The pin-up girl tank artwork is inspired by the Bomber nose art of that era. The leather used on the seat and saddlebags are reminiscent of the feel and color of an old bomber jacket.

If you want an Indian, be prepared to shell out some serious cash.  The price for an entry-level model starts at $25,999, and goes up from there.