Quick Hits

Motorcycle Daily joins the list of motojournalists who’ve tested the BMW K1600GT/GTL. They like it.

The Icon waterproof Patrol jacket seems very nice, if a bit pricey.

The Hyosung GT650 seems like a decent naked standard, considering its price.

Another decent photoshop rendering of the upcoming MV Agusta Brutale B3 675 triple.

Talk about electric vehicles all you want, but they aren’t ready for prime time, if the sales figures are any clue.

Wes Siler thinks the 200-ish horsepower BMW S1000RR would be a great first bike.  For beginners. Who just started riding.

For 2011, Suzuki gave the Gixxer 600–one of the most popular sportbikes ever produced– a complete overhaul. How good an overhaul is it? Motorcycle.Com’s Pete Brissette took it out on the track to see.

2011 Suzuki GSX-R600 and GSX-R750

Suzuki might have sat the last model year out in the US, but they unveiled new Gixxers at the German INTERMOT Bike Show to announce their triumphant return with slimmed-down models of what is probably the most popular sportbike in the world.

2011 Suzuki GSX-R600
2011 Suzuki GSX-R600

Visually, there’s no difference, other than paint schemes, between the 600cc and 750cc model Gixxers.  Indeed, they look similar to previous model years, too. Underneath the plastic, of course, it’s a bit of a different story. Suzuki has given the GSX-R series a new chassis, different ergos, and updated motors. A Showa Big-Piston Fork (BPF) replaces the conventional cartridge fork of previous years, while the wheels come with new hubs, axles, and bearings–which are incompatible with previous models, by the way. The brakes are now full-bull Brembo monoblocs. But the big difference shows up on the scales, with the new GSX-Rs shedding 18 pounds.

The bikes come equipped with the Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (S-DMS) system, which Suzuki says…

…allows the rider to use a button mounted on the left handlebar switch module to select one of two engine control maps, regulating the fuel injection, secondary throttle valve and ignition systems. The two maps are designated A and B, with Map A delivering full power and acceleration and Map B producing more moderate acceleration. The S-DMS system allows the rider to select a map to suit various riding conditions and personal preference on the road, for example choosing one map for highway cruising and the other map for tight country roads. Switching from one map to the other is instantaneous.

Sadly, a full spec sheet on the new Gixxers isn’t available yet, so we don’t know exactly what engine power increase goes along with the lower weight.

I have to say, the looks of the new Gixxers are an improvement on what was not an unattractive motorcycle to begin with.