Norton NRV588 at Bonneville

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Norton NRV588 at Bonneville
Norton NRV588 at Bonneville

Norton motorcycles has finally gotten an update online about their attempt at a land speed record at the Bonneville Salt Flats.  Actually, it’s more than one update.  They did a data dump of the last four days, pretty much all at once.  So far, it appears that they are pleased with their progress towards a record.

As we suspect, with only a mile run-in, Stuart is still accelerating as he hits the front line – indeed, he’s still accelerating as he throttles back at the end of the measured mile!

Alan Cathcart brings yet more glad tidings back with him from the organiser’s trailer, where he’s picked up our print-out.

160.31mph for the flying kilometre!! We’ve actually cracked 160 on only the second run!!!

The maths suggest that we entered the mile at around 150, and exited at about 170, so there would seem to be a-ways to go yet!!

The bike is still running well, no problems of any sort need to be fixed, the tyres are still perfect, so we finish up the day with a photo-shoot to record the event, before washing off all the salt and returning the beast to the South Bay trailer.

So, Stuart Garner, Norton’s CEO, hit 160MPH on his second run.  But, now is time to get serious, since they need to hit 175MPH to qualify.  It seems they’re off to a good start, though.

By the way, Confederate is there, too, trying to set a record on their new P120 Fighter Combat.

2010 Confederate P120 Fighter Combat

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Confederate Motorcycles, the Louisiana-based maker of extremely high-end motorcycles, is all set to publicly unveil their newest model, on August 14th at “The Quail, A Motorsports Gathering” in Carmel, CA.  The new P-120 Fighter Combat is powered by a 1966cc V-Twin engine, that puts out 160HP and 145lb-ft of torque.  As you can see from the pictures below, this model proves once again that Confederate is not…um…enslaved to conventional concepts of motorcycle design.

It’s very…shiny.

No word from  Confederate on what the production number will be.  They have production runs of anywhere from 35 bikes to 150 bikes per model, but whatever the number is, it’s going to be a very small number.  And the price tag will be a very large number, i.e. in the 6-digit range.

Hmmm.  You’d think that when you shell out 100 grand for a motorcycle, you’d at least get wheels matched to the design of the bike, wouldn’t you?  Heck, for that kind of money, you’d kind of expect the motorcycle to have a rear brake, too.

Well, you’d be wrong.