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BMW K1600 GTL Review

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Since I didn’t get invited to South Africa for the launch of BMW’s new Inline-6 touring bikes–and couldn’t afford to go if I did–I have to wait for another 2 months or so before I can even get a chance to look at one, much less ride one. Motorcycle.Com, on the other hand, suffers from no such limitation, so they have a review of the the big K1600GTL touring model.

I don't think you're supposed to do this. Or be able to do this, for that matter.

They seem impressed. Indeed, judging by the picture, too much so.

They rave on and on about its Gold-Wing-ass-kicking power, the cool electronics, and just about everything else they can think of to indicate how much better it is than the Gold Wing.

Things they loved:

  • Handling
  • Power
  • Brakes
  • Suspension
  • Chassis
  • Rider comfort
  • Air management]
  • Ergos

Things they hated:

  • Smaller passenger accommodations than the Gold Wing

Other than that, though, they think it’s a home run.

Its six-cylinder engine is sex on wheels with power to spare. Its agility and athleticism is positively shocking for such a big girl, and its suspension and brakes are best in class. What’s more, its array of standard and optional equipment put it in a league of its own.

Brit motorcycle journolist Kevin Ash has come up with another little niggle about the GT version, however, which is that, despite the higher torque of the I-6 powerplant, it actually doesn’t pull as hard in lower RPM ranges as the bike it replaces, the K1300GT, with its I-4.

For me, the 703 lb wet weight already made it a far less desirable bike, so I doubt if the new BMW is anywhere in my future.  Great concept though.  Shave 200 lbs off it, and call it the K1600S, though, and I might be willing to take a second look.

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