I think I know what I want

2009 Buell 1125R Arctic White
2009 Buell 1125R, Arctic White

I’ve pretty much decided what bike I want for a used 2nd bike. That’s it right over there on the left.

I want the 2009 Buell 1125R, in Arctic White, with the blue screen and wheels. I don’t want the 2010, with ugly “R” on the intake cowlings and the blue stuff blackened.

I want that bike in that color.

I’ve ridden it, and it has fantastic handling.  You’d think the steep rake would make it twitchy, but it isn’t.

It’s a vibey, growly twin that weighs 450lbs wet, and, in stock configuration, puts 130 HP and about 75 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheel, according to Sport Rider. It’d be a big change from my FJR, that’s for sure.

It also has really comfy ergos for me–in sportbike terms, at any rate, and would be great little commuter, especially on the winding roads through Bonsall that I ride twice a day.

The only possible problem I can see is that, looking at Cycle Trader today, there is exactly one available.  In the entire US. And it’s 3,000 miles away in Florida. So, there is the slight possibility that finding exactly this bike, in decent shape, may have some degree of difficulty attached to it. But I remain stupidly optimistic that this obstacle can be overcome.

At the moment, it’s not really an obstacle at all, since I wouldn’t be able to buy so much as a creme-filled donught until I pay of my income tax bill for this year. But, perhaps in late summer…

By the way, I’ve been perusing Craigslist, Oodle, and Cycle Trader a lot over the past week or so.  Here’s an observation for prospective motorcycle sellers. Just because you had a custom paint job consisting of electric blue and gold skulls and half-naked ladies on the fairing, and then chromed the swingarm and all exposed engine parts doesn’t mean that your seven year old CBR1000RR is worth $8,000. Seriously. Trust me on that.

It’s a Photoshop…but it’s a good Photoshop

Aprilia will be revealing a new bike as a successor to the Tuareg, called the Aprilia Caponord 1200. Essentially, it’s a bit of a worked over Dorsoduro 1200. There were some spy shots of the thing floating around yesterday, but..you know spy shots. They suck.
So, Moto-Infos.com got busy with Photoshop and produced this recreation of the bike in the spy shots.

2012 Aprilia Caponord 1200
2012 Aprilia Caponord 1200

It’s probably fairly close to what the bike will look like, but I have to wonder what the actual bike will be like. The big competitor for Aprilia here is the massively wonderful Ducati Multistrada 1200, which not only lays down a cavalry company’s worth of horses at the rear wheel, but also boasts all sorts of electronic goodness like traction control, electronic suspension adjustment, three ride modes, etc.

Details on the Caponord are going to be really sketchy until the EICMA show in Italy this fall, so we’ll have to wait and see if the bike’s electronics and internals will be anywhere near as impressive.

BMW K1600 GTL Review

Since I didn’t get invited to South Africa for the launch of BMW’s new Inline-6 touring bikes–and couldn’t afford to go if I did–I have to wait for another 2 months or so before I can even get a chance to look at one, much less ride one. Motorcycle.Com, on the other hand, suffers from no such limitation, so they have a review of the the big K1600GTL touring model.

I don't think you're supposed to do this. Or be able to do this, for that matter.

They seem impressed. Indeed, judging by the picture, too much so.

They rave on and on about its Gold-Wing-ass-kicking power, the cool electronics, and just about everything else they can think of to indicate how much better it is than the Gold Wing.

Things they loved:

  • Handling
  • Power
  • Brakes
  • Suspension
  • Chassis
  • Rider comfort
  • Air management]
  • Ergos

Things they hated:

  • Smaller passenger accommodations than the Gold Wing

Other than that, though, they think it’s a home run.

Its six-cylinder engine is sex on wheels with power to spare. Its agility and athleticism is positively shocking for such a big girl, and its suspension and brakes are best in class. What’s more, its array of standard and optional equipment put it in a league of its own.

Brit motorcycle journolist Kevin Ash has come up with another little niggle about the GT version, however, which is that, despite the higher torque of the I-6 powerplant, it actually doesn’t pull as hard in lower RPM ranges as the bike it replaces, the K1300GT, with its I-4.

For me, the 703 lb wet weight already made it a far less desirable bike, so I doubt if the new BMW is anywhere in my future.  Great concept though.  Shave 200 lbs off it, and call it the K1600S, though, and I might be willing to take a second look.