I write stuff. A lot of it is about cars and motorcycles.

This is getting a little ridiculous

Honda asked some bike designers to go all out with their visions of the Honda Fury, the factory chopper Honda’s been touting for several months now, as well as the new Stateline and Saber.  They got these:

Honda Concept Furious

Honda Concept Furious, by Nick Renner. Based on the Fury.

Honda Concept Slammer

Honda Concept Slammer, by Erik Dunshee. Based on the Stateline.

Honda Concept Switchblade

Honda Concept Switchblade, by Edward Birtulescu. Based on the Saber.

There’s nothing wrong with these concepts visually, if you don’t mind a bit of motorcycle with your Arlen-Nessiness.  But, at the end of they day, they’re all 65HP VTX1300s.  No machine based on the VTX1300 can possibly be “Furious”.  Of course, I’m a grown-up, so I realize that there’s not much marketing magic in calling a bike the “Mildly Annoyed”.

On the plus side, you would at least look good tooling along at 45MPH on one of these babys.  Just don’t expect things to turn out well if someone offers to race you for “pinks”. Not that anyone would, because, you know, who’d want to take one of these away from you? Their best-case scenario is that they’d win a VTX 1300.

Yes, yes, it’s a Honda, so I’m sure it’d be finely crafted, smooth, and reliable as all hell. But the VTX1300 platform is, in a word, boring. It’s as dependable a platform as you could ask for…but who would.  Honda’s a fine company, and they make some great bikes (see CBR1000RR or Gold Wing), but the VTX1300 is far closer to “workmanlike” than “great”.

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