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Is Honda’s DCT Tranny Obsolete?

The new Dual Clutch Transmission in the Honda VFR1200F may already be headed for the dustbin of history. So may manual transmissions on all motorcycles. A&R reports that British transmission gurus Xtrac have developed something called the Instantaneous Gearchange System (IGS).

IGS works by using a ratchet and pawl mechanism between the gear hubs, the main shaft is able to select and engage two gears simultaneously, with only one set of drive gears. With two years of racing on the Instantaneous Gearchange System already completed, Xtrac believes IGS is ready for prime time, and adoption in OEM automobile and motorcycle solutions.

So, there’s no need for a clutch lever. Simply pop the shifter button and the next set of gears seamlessly engage with no loss of power. As an added plus, it’s not only far less complex than the DCT system, it’s also far lighter.

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4 Responses to Is Honda’s DCT Tranny Obsolete?

  • Why is this better than the YCCS on our FJR-AE’s?

  • Well, it’s a completely different system. First of all, it’s essentially clutchless, and can run in a fully automatic mode.

    The AE model of the FJR is a standard tranny, but it has an electronic clutch grafted onto it, which, with all the stuff it needs to work, makes the transmission system significantly heavier. Also, the clutch kicks in anytime the revs fall below 2500RPM, which makes it a bit tricky to maneuver around in parking lots.

  • “Also, the clutch kicks in anytime the revs fall below 2500RPM, which makes it a bit tricky to maneuver around in parking lots.”
    I’m ok in parking lots, it’s doing a U-turn on a country road that gives me the willies on my AE.

  • Heh.  tell me about it.

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