I write stuff. A lot of it is about cars and motorcycles.

California outlaws loud pipes

I guess now we’ll see if loud pipes really do save lives.

California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Senate Bill 435 yesterday that will authorize state law enforcement to ticket motorcyclists who have swapped out their stock pipes for an aftermarket exhaust. The new law will make it a crime to operate a motorcycle manufactured after January 1, 2013, that does not meet federal noise-emission standards. Motorcycles will be required to display a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) label certifying that the exhaust system is clean burning and does not exceed 80 decibels. First-time offenders will face fines up to $100 while subsequent infractions can run up to $250.

Now that it’s become law in California, you can expect this to be implemented in other states as well.

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4 Responses to California outlaws loud pipes

  • New motorcycle sales after January 2013 will be interesting.  I suspect Harley’s sales will be negatively impacted after that date, and the price of used Harleys will rise.
    I’ve already commented here about my feelings toward loud exhausts, but I just wish they’d enforce the laws already on the books rather than pass new, stupid laws.

  • GOOD FOR ARNOLD!!!
    I cannot wait for the other states to do this as well.

  • Thats a shame that the state has nothing else to worry about but some noise problem .Tell that to my father that was killed by a car that could’nt hear him next to her maybe some loud pipes might save YOUR LIFE!!!

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