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2010 Victory Vegas LE Review – Motorcycle.com

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Pete Brissette of Motorcycle.com got to spend a week on Bike #1 of 100 brand new 2010 Victory Vegas LEs.  He loved it.

2010 Victory Vegas LE

2010 Victory Vegas LE

First off, The Vegas LE dumps the standard 100ci V-twin for the more powerful Stage 2 106ci mill, which provides a generous 97 hp at 5000 rpm and 113 ft-lb at a lowly 2750 rpm.  That’s 12 horsies more than the 100ci powerplant, and 10 ft-lb more, too.  Victory claims that putting the 106 into the Vegas makes it the fastest Victory yet.

As you can see, the styling is updated a bit, too, dumping a lot of chrome and replacing it with black powder-coated trim.  It looks like it has just enough, but not too much Arlen-Nessiness in the design.  And, frankly, it doesn’t take a lot for there to be too much Arlen-Nessiness.  He can go a little overboard with al the swoopy curves and what-not.  The Vegas LE, though, looks to be about right in the design department, right down to the blacked-out, curved pipes.

In fact, my real quibble with Victory’s motorcycles is the shape of the jugs.  They just look like somebody stuck two blenders on top of the engine.  Technically, however, the air/oil-cooled, four-valves-per-cylinder, SOHC V-Twin is a thing of beauty.

Brissette concludes:

The Vegas LE possesses lots of powerful, low-end grunt by virtue of the most potent standard engine Victory has made to date. Yet the LE is largely a standard Vegas model and so enjoys the better handling and steering provided by the standard Vegas’ 180-section rear tire versus the chubby 250 found on the Jackpot model.

So, it has the big power of the Jackpot mated with the standard Vegas’ good handling. The LE is the perfect blend.

I can’t argue with that.

Sadly, Victory is only making 100 of these, and I suspect they’ll all be gone quickly.

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